Suppressor Cleaning Test [VIDEO]

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Treating in a food dehydrator with several coats of FireClean before initial use.

Suppressors are very difficult to clean.  Unsuppressed, all the hot gas and lead is expelled out of the barrel, however in addition to the sound a silencer also has to catch all the hot gas, lead and carbon from the cartridges ignition.  This creates a cleaning nightmare in rimfire and low pressure handgun suppressors.

Treating in a food dehydrator with several coats of FireClean before initial use.

Treating in a food dehydrator with several coats of FireClean before initial use.

Rimfire suppressors are the worst.  So before I even shot my new Griffin Armament Checkmate .22lr suppressor I heated it and coated it several times with FireClean.  I’ve used FireClean in our Marksmanship Camp rifles with great success, so I wanted to see how it would perform on a virgin suppressor.  After over 500 rounds I was pretty impressed with the results.  Note that the owner’s manual recommends cleaning every 250 rounds.  I doubled that easy:

The FireClean still wet inside the can is a testament to how well sealed the Checkmate is, most of that blew out of course, but I treated on April 12, shot several hundred rounds though it in 3-4 range sessions, then took it apart on July 3 for this video.  Next time I’ll take some better pics of all the fouling, but here is a pic of 2 baffles side by side, before and after cleaning:

Checkmate baffles before (right) and after (left) just wiping with a rag.

Checkmate baffles before (right) and after (left) just wiping with a rag.

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