Did the Government Secretly Stock Timber Rattlers in Texas? And what about those Texas lynx?

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Reader Amber Deranger captured a photo of this timber rattler on her deer lease.

In a secret effort to replenish diminishing timber rattlesnake stocks, government officials have been stocking captive-bred specimens of the venomous reptiles at various locations within Texas’ National Forest land.
At least that’s the story that has been floating around East Texas for years.
It is unclear as to which agency is responsible but some reports indicate it could be the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service while another rumor has it linked to a clandestine university project.
I say “story” but the truth is I have heard numerous tales of rattlesnake restoration efforts in the Pineywoods of East Texas. One gentleman even told me his uncle’s brother-in-law had some released next to his farm near Crockett. Hundreds of them.
Where did these stories originate?

Reader Amber Deranger captured a photo of this timber rattler on her deer lease.

Well, rattlesnakes have technically been “released” into certain areas in the Pineywoods. However, scientists did not breed them in captivity and they are not part of some secret restoration effort.
These “released” rattlesnakes are simply ones that were captured as part of a radio-telemetry study conducted by officials with the U.S. Forest Service. Timber rattlesnake were captured in the wild, fitted with radio transmitters and released back into the wild so researchers could track their movements.
There never has been a timber rattlesnake stocking program in Texas or anywhere else for that matter.
According to TPWD endangered species specialist, Ricky Maxey, the rumors have been floating around since the 1990s.
“I used to work in the Big Thicket area out of Beaumont and we used to get questions about rattlesnake stockings frequently. And it seems the rumors are still pretty rampant,” Maxey said.
“Someone could have seen Forest Service officials capturing the snakes or releasing the ones fitted with transmitters and the rumor could have started there. Then again, it could be the case of a true story getting less and less truthful as it’s told,” he said.
This story is similar to another albeit slightly less widespread tale of  the Texas Parks & Wildlife Department (TPWD) releasing Canada lynx into the Pineywoods region. I first heard of these stockings taking place in the Livingston area but later heard they also occurred near Toledo Bend reservoir and in the Big Thicket National Preserve.
Occasionally people would see one of these “lynx”, which are allegedly much larger than a Texas bobcat.
The problem is these stories are bogus. Totally bogus.
TPWD or any other agency for that matter have never stocked Canada lynx (Lynx Canadensis) into any destination in Texas and for that matter would have no reason to do so. They have never lived in the region and their very close cousin the bobcat (Lynx Rufus) is doing incredibly well here.
Bobcats can vary greatly in size as previously noted. A hunter for example who shoots a 20-pound bobcat might be shocked to see a 35-pound cat with long legs that looks as if it were a giant in comparison to the animal they took. Some bobcats tend to be very “leggy” while others are thick.
Ear tuft length also varies among individuals. Most bobcats have short but some are comparable to those of their northern cousins.
Spot patterns also vary wildly with some having virtually no spots on the top half and others possessing well-defined spots. A few individuals have a unique pattern traits of spots within spots that look sort of like the rosettes of an ocelot or jaguar.
People seeing this “different” looking bobcats sometimes associate them with Canada lynx and at some point a stocking legend began. In a way that is a shame because, our very own lynx, the bobcat, is an amazing cat.
Having these mysteries solved might ruin your favorite deer camp story but the fact is there really is no mystery. The rattlesnake “stocking” was not a stocking at all but re-release of a few snakes fitted with transmitters.
And the lynx story is false all the way.
Remember not everything you read on the Internet is true and many tales told at hunting camp are pretty tall in their own right.
Chester Moore, Jr.

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